Sabi Sound is a modern studio stocked with vintage instruments and carefully selected microphones, preamps, plugins, pedals, and outboard gear.

The room sounds and records beautifully thanks to careful tuning and application of sonic treatments such as diffusors, bass traps, and broadband absorbers.

Owned and operated by producer, engineer, and multi-instrumentalist Eric Segalstad,
Sabi Sound offers a flexible workflow and is designed to encourage many options to the creative mind.

Recording

Mixing

Production

Engineered, mixed, and produced at Sabi Sound

desk job
Eric Segalstad at Sabi Sound

Eric Segalstad

I'm a multi-instrumentalist, engineer, mixer, and producer and nothing gets me more stoked than helping musicians turn their vision into a finished track or record.

Sabi Sound (pronounced “sah-be”) is my studio and creative sound lab and where I create, play, record and mix music.

The name Sabi Sound is inspired by the traditional Japanese concept wabi-sabi, an aesthetic that finds beauty in things with character and imperfection. Take the inside of a simple glazed teacup and imagine that countless pours of hot water have changed its color over time. That is Sabi.

Sabi Sound is a creative and inspiring place that I love to share. It’s home to a carefully curated collection of vintage guitars, vintage drum kits, choice microphones, analog synths, a Wurlie, a Hammond, tube amps from the 1950s and 1960s. 

The right kind of instruments inspire and many are put to use in one way or another on pretty much every project. Maybe it’s a guitar riff that really calls for that ‘65 Fender Jaguar sent through a brownface Princeton or the ‘59 Supro. Or a special snare matched with the super versatile Sonor teardrop house kit.

I’m here to help and facilitate. I know the room, the instruments, the microphones and how the various combinations and signal chains can help elevate and set your song apart. If we’re making a record, each song should sound and feel distinct. Playing a different guitar, singing into a different mic, programming a new synth sound or using a special snare helps bring that distinction. And it’s not just the auditory, it’s also how you respond to and approach a different instrument from a familiar one. 

While many of the instruments have been played for 50 years or longer, the technology to capture these vibrations is brand new. Universal Audio’s Apollo 8 and 8p maintain high fidelity A/D and D/A conversion. Analog outboard, tube gear, plugins, and character pieces bring warmth, grime, and second and third order harmonics as needed.